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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the decision and ben bernanke's news conference starting at 12:15. we'll talk to steve leaseman live later in the program. >>> another story that you heard about yesterday, the -- you know, violence and death threats and blood and guts. big implications for big labor. that is michigan's decision to become a right-to-work state. thousands of protesters and union members converged on the capitol in lansing yesterday to object to the measure that would bar unions from requiring workers to pay membership dues and to join the union. governor snyder signed the measure into law. >> shouldn't the unionsing putting out a proposition that workers want to join a union? and shouldn't workers feel free to make that choice to say their dollars are going to the union or not based on they feel they're getting results? so that's what this is really doing. so that's why i view this as pro-worker, not anti-union. >> the right-to-work clause regarded as a big blow to organized labor which has seen membership decline across the country. down to private sector 7%. >> you think overall, isn't it, 7%? more than 5
, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from study after study that they will have more trouble establishing a skill going forward. there will be a crisis for us in the country, but we will also be sitting by and letting a new structural skills gap expand because we're not taking enough efforts right now to get people back to work and deal with long- term unemployment. secondly, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the l
the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? well, fed chair ben bernanke warns that we're already paying the price for teetering on the edge of this fiscal cliff and he points to a recent drop in consumer and business confidence and says he hopes that congress will do the right thing and not kick the can down the road. >>> so that brings us to our fourth story, outfront. deal, no deal? deal, no deal? it is not a howie mandell story. it has everything to do about the fiscal cliff. and it's happening behind closed doors. and what is said in public does not seem to clear anything up. >> the longer the white house slow walks this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff, and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> so what's really going on behind the scenes? earlier i spoke with republican senator jeff sessions, who's been asking the same question, and i asked him how much he, as the ranking member of the senate budget committee, actually knows about what's going on. >> very little. almost nothing, frankly. i mean, i learned from s
's updated economic forecast at 2:00 p.m. and ben bernanke's news conference at 2:15. the fed is expected to launch a new bond buying program called operation twist that will expire at the enovd month. james, we know this is a huge meeting. this is obviously a good time for the fed to embark on something new for 2013. is this the wise approach? >> well, it's the wise approach in a very near term, a, because operation twist is coming to an end. b, because we have the fiscal cliff or fiscal gentle slope or whatever it turns out to be to negotiate and c, because we haven't found our legs in the u.s. and we clearly have some global headwinds coming in 2013. however, the thing about this qe in the u.s., unlike previous ones where they could see big economic problems, let's comfort the market with a really big number, this time we're going to do it month by month. solo the annual figures look very big, they're going to halt qe as long as it looks like there's inflation. >> which means there might not be much market reaction as investors realize that. >>> find out what travelers are still flocki
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)